Month: February 2020

Deng looking forward to Lakers renaissance

first_imgMOST READ View comments Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila If Deng’s past is anything to go by, the Lakers have made a shrewd investment. Time and again, Deng has faced down all challenges successfully.A tumultuous early life saw him move to Egypt with his mother and eight brothers and sisters as Sudan’s civil war raged.His father, a government minister, was later arrested and imprisoned after a military coup before fleeing to Britain in 1993 and claiming political asylum.Reunited with his family in London, Deng quickly embraced his new surroundings. He became an avid Arsenal fan, idolizing striker Ian Wright, before his rapidly developing frame persuaded him to concentrate on basketball.Rebuilding projectWhile playing for his local club — the Brixton Topcats — he was spotted by an American talent scout, who swiftly offered him a scholarship to the prestigious Blair Academy private school in New Jersey.ADVERTISEMENT Record-setting Warriors add Durant for ‘Superteam’ status BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise “Success for everybody’s going to be something different,” he said. “The important thing for us is to focus on the fundamentals — build the right atmosphere, play hard every game, play unselfishly, play for each other. That’s what I’m here to try and do.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Luol Deng #9 of the Los Angeles Lakers speaks to members of the press during Los Angeles Laker media day at Toyota Sports Center on September 26, 2016 in El Segundo, California. Harry How/Getty Images/AFPWhether fleeing civil war in Sudan with his family or moving to the United States on a scholarship as a 14-year-old, Luol Deng is no stranger to new beginnings.The 31-year-old British forward’s nomadic existence has now taken him to Hollywood, where he is expected to be a key figure as the Los Angeles Lakers attempt to rebuild after the worst season in their history.ADVERTISEMENT Deng arrived as a wide-eyed 14-year-old, alone and homesick, but determined not to waste the opportunity of a lifetime. By the time of his senior year, he was regarded the second most valuable high school prospect in the United States after LeBron James.After one season at Duke University — playing for legendary “Coach K” Mike Krzyzewski — Deng entered the NBA draft in 2004, and was chosen as the seventh pick overall by the Phoenix Suns before being immediately traded to Chicago.Twice named to the NBA All-Star team in 2012 and 2013, Deng has yet to land an NBA Finals ring, with the closest he has come being a defeat in the Eastern Conference finals with Chicago in 2011.With the Lakers crashing to their worst-ever 17-65 season last year, Deng is unlikely to be challenging for championship honors with his new employers any time soon. Nevertheless, he remains enthused by the challenge of a daunting rebuilding project.“At this point in my career, even though I’ve been in the league 13 years, I’ve still got a lot of basketball to play. There’s a lot I could do,” Deng said.“From my perspective, whatever happened here last season, that’s the past. “For the group now, this is a new beginning and we’ve got a lot to prove. “We’ve got young guys who’ve got a lot to learn but also who are willing to work hard and improve. We’ve got a system that is really exciting.”Deng is wise enough to avoid setting concrete season targets for an inexperienced team still in transition. Deng joined the Lakers on a four-year $72 million deal in July, lured by the possibility of working with new coach Luke Walton at the start of a long-term project to revive the iconic franchise.Deng’s arrival provides a young Lakers squad with a pillar of maturity, bringing grit and a wealth of experience gleaned from previous stints with the Chicago Bulls, Cleveland Cavaliers and Miami Heat.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“It’s a new chapter for me. This is my 13th year now. I’m looking forward to being a part of it and leading the young guys,” Deng told AFP at a Lakers media session.“I’m only 31, so I still have a lot of playing in me. I’m looking forward to being a leader on and off the court through my work ethic.” BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise EDITORS’ PICK Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town We are younglast_img read more

Mac Belo adjusting to being a marked man

first_imgGinebra teammates show love for Slaughter PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Not helping Belo was his defender, Glenn Khobuntin, who he fought in numerous wars in the UAAP and even had his number back in 2014 when the latter’s National University topped the former’s Far Eastern University in the Finals.“He knows me well because we played each other in the UAAP Finals, and in the SEA Games, we were the ones guarding each other. Lately too in 3×3, so we really know each other’s game.”But in the eyes of coach Leo Isaac, it’s going to be important for Belo to bounce back and learn from these experiences as he develops into one of Blackwater’s top guns.“Teams have started taking notice of him. He has been scouted so we have to make adjustments and he also has to improve his craft,” the mentor said.Belo is aware of the pressure on him to continue improving, but what’s important to him is that the Elite finally ended their two-game skid.ADVERTISEMENT As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Boyet Fernandez set to return to San Beda “The important thing is we bounced back from our two losses. Hopefully, we can sustain this so our Christmas will be good.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next But the Midsayap, North Cotabato native doesn’t mind as long as his team comes out victorious.“It’s OK because we got the win. The outcome was good because our scoring was balanced. That’s the important thing, that we got the win,” he said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliBelo also noticed that after his hot start, teams have begun to zero in on him on defense, with the Road Warriors limiting him to a measly eight shots in the outing.“NLEX’s defense on me was good because they were denying me the ball. At the start, I was reading the defense, feeling my way, and letting my teammates do the work and that’s the reason why I had a low field goal.” Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town View comments Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports EDITORS’ PICKcenter_img Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Senators to proceed with review of VFA Mac Belo. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMac Belo isn’t losing sleep over his recent dip in scoring for Blackwater.After averaging 23 points in his first three games, the rookie only netted nine points in the Elite’s 96-85 win against NLEX.ADVERTISEMENT Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND We are young MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Super plane, satellites help map the Caribbean’s hidden coral reefs

first_imgSatellites, aircraft and scuba divers are creating the first ever high-resolution map of coral reefs throughout the Caribbean region.Layers of data with 10-centimeter (4-inch) resolution will reveal the extent of damage from recent hurricanes and identify pockets of living coral to protect, as well as ailing coral that can be restored.The maps will be used to declare new marine protected areas, guide management plans and select areas for post-hurricane restoration. PUNTA CANA, Dominican Republic — At 8 o’clock on a May morning the Caribbean Sea was calm, offering a clean window to the underwater realm. Flying 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above the ocean, ecologist Greg Asner’s twin-propeller flying laboratory was at what he calls the “goldilocks distance.” Fly higher and the textured detail of each turquoise patch of coral reef below becomes invisible. Fly lower and the details overwhelm the big picture.At this altitude, above the gemstone-like waters surrounding Punta Cana in the Dominican Republic, Asner’s plane can see both entire reefs and individual heads of coral in revolutionary detail. The plane is loaded with nearly a metric ton of sensors and computers that allow it to determine, at 10-centimeter (4-inch) resolution, not just where the coral is but also its health and even its species.Asner, based at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Stanford, California, molded technology first developed by NASA to peer at the chemical composition of alien planets into what may be the most powerful instrument for conservation science here on Earth: the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO), as his plane is called.“Caribbean reefs are getting hammered by hurricanes, coral bleaching and pollution. But the CAO can see the patches of surviving coral that can repopulate this system,” Asner told Mongabay.Greg Asner (left), founder of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, and Joseph Pollock (right), coral strategy director for The Nature Conservancy, aboard the Carnegie Airborne Observatory. Image by Marjo Aho/TNC.The flight was part of a mission to create the first ever high-resolution map of coral reefs throughout the Caribbean. In addition to the CAO, more than 100 satellites, drones and scuba divers will contribute data to the map, integrating layers of information at multiple scales. The project is a collaboration between Asner’s new Reefscape Project, which studies reefs around the world; the Arlington, Virginia-based conservation group The Nature Conservancy; and the San Francisco-based private satellite company Planet.The resulting map of the Caribbean region’s coral reefs will help decision-makers identify the top priorities for conservation.last_img read more

Facebook video shows orangutan defending forest against bulldozer

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Dramatic footage released last week by an animal welfare group shows a wild orangutan trying in vain to fight off destruction of its rainforest home in Borneo.The video, filmed in 2013 but posted on Facebook on June 5th for World Environment Day by International Animal Rescue (IAR), was shot in Sungai Putri, a tract of forest in Indonesia’s West Kalimantan province.Sungai Putri is one of the most important refuges for orangutans left in Indonesian Borneo. According to orangutan expert Erik Meijaard, Sungai Putri may be home to over 1,000 orangutans. Dramatic footage released last week by an animal welfare group shows a wild orangutan trying in vain to fight off destruction of its rainforest habitat in Borneo.The video (below), filmed in 2013 but posted on Facebook on June 5th for World Environment Day by International Animal Rescue (IAR), was shot in Sungai Putri, a tract of forest in Indonesia’s West Kalimantan province that is being destroyed for timber. Most of the remaining forest in the Sungai Putri landscape lies within a concession held by PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa, a logging company.Orangutan vs bulldozerThe video shows an orangutan running along the trunk of a tree that an excavator has just knocked down. The orangutan reaches up to grab the excavator bucket, but loses its balance and falls to the ground.IAR says the orangutan was subsequently captured and brought back to the group’s wildlife rehabilitation center in Ketapang.“This desperate orangutan is frantically seeking refuge from the destructive power of the bulldozer; a machine that has already decimated everything else around him,” IAR wrote in the Facebook post. “Despite all the obstacles thrown at them, our team were able to rescue this orangutan and bring him to safety.”Sungai Putri is one of the most important refuges for orangutans left in Indonesian Borneo. According to orangutan expert Erik Meijaard, Sungai Putri may be home to over 1,000 orangutans.“At about 57,000 hectares (141,000 acres), [Sungai Putri] is a sizable piece of forest enough to provide a home to between 750 and 1750 orangutans,” he wrote in an analysis on the track of coastal peatland. “This makes it the third largest population of this Critically Endangered species in the province.”The canal through the peat swamp forest in Sungai Putri allegedly dug by PT Mohairson Pawan Khatulistiwa. Image courtesy of International Animal Rescue.A report released last week by Greenpeace revealed that deforestation is continuing within Sungai Putri despite a high-level Indonesian government commitment to protect the forest.“This is a major embarrassment for the Indonesian government, which has consistently promised to protect Sungai Putri,” Greenpeace campaigner Ratri Kusumohartono said in a statement. Greenpeace and IAR are calling on the Indonesian government to stand by its commitment.“Sungai Putri is home to one of the largest populations in the world and we are at a critical point for the Bornean orangutan, without forests like this they can’t survive,” Karmele Llano Sanchez, program director of International Animal Rescue in Indonesia, said. “It is time for the Indonesian government to ensure the full protection of Sungai Putri, its environment and wildlife.”center_img Animal Welfare, Apes, Deforestation, Forests, Great Apes, Logging, Orangutans, Peatlands, Primates, Rainforests, Wildlife, Wildlife Rescues last_img read more

In Vietnam, cable car plans continue to threaten important cave system

first_imgCaves, Ecotourism, Forest Destruction, Forests, National Parks, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Tourism, Tropical Forests Article published by Genevieve Belmaker Once construction is finished, the cable car could carry thousands of tourists to Son Doong cave every day.Currently, fewer than 800 people visit the caves every year through sustainable eco-tourism company Oxalis.There is also growing concern that a cable car could irreparably damage the area’s primary forests.An online petition that’s part of the campaign against the development has garnered about 170,000 signatures. PHONG NHA, Vietnam – Since 2014, one of the world’s largest cave systems has been under threat from developers planning to construct a cable car that would carry thousands of tourists every day.Some are pointing out that this could also irreparably damage the area’s primary forests. A movement to stop the cable car reaching the area known as Son Doong cave spearheaded by Vietnamese environmentalist Huong Le has gained traction over the last 3.5 years. Huong has been involved in efforts to garner what is now up to over 170,000 signatures on a petition against the proposed development.The caves in question, which feature some of the world’s largest stalactites and cave pearls, are truly remarkable. Located in a UNESCO’s World Heritage site called Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park, Son Doong cave is so large it contains a fast-flowing, subterranean river, two jungles, a beach that visitors can camp on overnight, and seven endemic species that don’t exist anywhere else in the world. It has the largest cross section of any cave – twice that of its nearest rival – and is tall enough to fit in a 40-story building.Tetracoral fossils within the cave. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Currently, a sustainable eco-tour brings fewer than 800 people to Son Doong annually. In comparison, the proposed cable car would bring about 1,000 people every hour, a shift that would threaten the pristine ecosystems within the cave.Many also fear the construction needed for the cable cars would damage forest near the entrance and put pressure on the cave’s fragile roof, potentially triggering further dolines, which is when the roof of the caves collapses due to limestone erosion.Cave Pearls within the rimstone system. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Vietnamese real estate company Sun Group initially proposed construction of a cable car in 2014, but scrapped the plans entirely, Huong believes, due to public support for the petition. In the summer of 2017, Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc approved a new plan to build a cable car into nearby En Cave (the world’s third largest), this time headed by Vietnamese real estate giants FLC Group. Since then, the company has kept quiet about their plans for the project.Efforts to stop the cable car, however, have been gathering pace. And in a nation where, historically, the Communist Party of Vietnam has not supported organized expression of collective identity, social media has, to an extent, provided a platform for civil society movements to form.Huong Le’s Save Son Doong Facebook page, for example, has gained hundreds of thousands of followers. It propelled her to a speaker’s spot at a TEDx event in Hanoi this past June.Her brave, spirited speech, which covered not only the caves, but also the issue of political transparency in Vietnam, drew tears, wild applause, and a standing ovation from the audience.Large rimstone system near the second doline. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Huong works full-time at Saigon’s Fulbright University as an admissions officer and dedicates her free time to the Save Son Doong campaign. Her efforts earned her a place on Forbes Vietnam’s 30 under 30 list earlier this year, a scholarship to study in the US and even a chance to speak to Barack Obama during his state visit to Vietnam in 2016. Obama later declared in his address to the nation that Son Doong Cave should be preserved for future generations.The core message of Huong’s TEDx speech was the importance of protecting the fragile ecosystems within the cave. Between 2 and 4 million years old, the caves have been untouched by human hands for millennia and, as a result, pristine ecosystems have thrived within.With two dolines already puncturing the roof, light has been able to enter, creating some of the largest areas of intact primary forest anywhere in Vietnam and an impressively high level of biodiversity: over 800 vertebrate species have been recorded in the area, including 154 mammals, 117 reptiles, 58 amphibians, 314 birds, and 170 fish.Sand Towers inside Son Doong Cave. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Phuong Tạ, head of Hanoi University’s ecology department and the first scientist allowed to explore and study the caves, has been instrumental in inspiring and informing Huong. “Each cave is a separate world, an individual ecosystem,” Phuong said. “Each one has a different temperature, humidity and air quality. All of this creates an ecosystem in which only a few animals can adapt and survive.”Phuong stresses that there are unique creatures in the cave such as arthropods, blind fish, rare myriapoda centipedes and white translucent shrimp that can only thrive in an environment that’s disconnected from the outside world. He also found cave pearls the size of baseballs, which is unheard of anywhere else in the world, along with rimstones, tetra coral fossils and 70m (230 feet) stalagmites. But if more light, noise, or even “human breath” finds its way inside, he says, the ecosystem could be “severely affected.”When the cable car plans shifted to En Cave, Phuong drafted a letter to Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc asserting the right of local people to resist the cable car. According to the letter, which Mongabay gained access to, “Even if they get to En Cave it’s in the centre of Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park, and the tropical forest ecosystem there should be protected. If the cable car gets there the forest will definitely be ruined.” The Vietnamese government responded noting receipt of the letter, but made no further contact.A rimstone system on a stalactite inside Son Doong Cave. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Despite the lack of response, efforts like Phuong’s may be the only way to save the caves. When Huong first explored Son Doong Cave, she met British Cave Expert Howard Limbert, the man who dedicated 18 years of his life to discovering the cave, and he explained the importance of Vietnamese intervention.During the trek, Limbert spoke to Huong at length. “I was the only Vietnamese in the group. He shared with me the news about the cable car, and that was the very first time I heard of it. That was July 2014. I think what moved me the most was that he said he regretted discovering this place.” Huong noted in her TEDx talk that Limbert broke down in tears as he spoke of his regret.“Obviously this cave means a lot to this man,” she said. “He dedicated so much of his life to discovering it, and then he felt hopeless. But he carried on saying we still have hope, but the people who can actually make changes must be Vietnamese people. As a foreigner, he can only provide advice, not actually advocate for changes.”Cave Pearls within the rimstone system. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)It was this talk that lit a fire in Huong, and she hasn’t ceased campaigning since. Limbert, meanwhile, has found himself at the vanguard of eco-tourism in Vietnam. Oxalis, the adventure tour company he works for, now employs 550 people from Quang Binh Province, some of whom used to be involved in illegal logging and hunting in the area.For Limbert, the connection between employment and conservation couldn’t be clearer. By providing jobs to locals, he says, the temptation to get involved in illegal, environmentally damaging activities is taken away. “There’s no hunting now,” he said, “there’s no logging of rare woods. We’re seeing far more animals appearing in the area where we run tours.”Tetracoral fossils within the cave. (Photo courtesy Professor Phuong Ta)Every action has a consequence, however, and Phuong notes that, even with small, eco-friendly tours, there is evidence of environmental wear and tear in the caves. “Five years ago I visited Son Doong for the first time,” he said. “Recently, I went in again, and I saw that the system of cave pearls has faded, its quality worsened and become drier.” If more people come in, he says, this deterioration would continue, although he is yet to complete his latest round of scientific analysis.For Huong Le, the need to campaign and protect the caves and the forests within them remains as urgent as ever. Rampant development continues to blight Vietnamese landscapes; this year, an enormous casino will open on Phu Quoc Island, while the pollution of Ha Long Bay demonstrates what happens when nature is sacrificed for tourism. Nobody wants Son Doong to be the next regret.“The more signatures we have [on our petition], the more likes on Facebook, it helps send a message directly to the cable car company,” she said. “It used to be Sun Group, and the reason they pulled out of the project is because of our followers. The easy thing people in Vietnam and around the world can do right away would be to sign the petition and follow us on Facebook. Talk about it, share it, and raise your voice.”Banner image: A butterfly in the forest outside Son Doong Cave (Courtesty Professor Phuong Ta).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more